Heart Nuclear Stress Test

What is a Heart Nuclear Stress Test?

A nuclear stress test is a diagnostic test used to evaluate blood flow to the heart. During the test, a small amount of radioactive tracer is injected into a vein. A special camera, called a gamma camera, detects the radiation released by the tracer to produce computer images of the heart. Combined with exercise, the test can help determine if there is adequate blood flow to the heart during activity versus at rest.

Combined with exercise, the test can help determine if there is adequate blood flow to the heart during activity versus at rest.

Who should get a Heart Nuclear Stress Test?

Physicians use cardiac nuclear medicine studies to help diagnose cardiac disease. The symptoms include::

  1. Unexplained chest pain.
  2. Chest pain brought on by exercise (called angina).

Cardiac nuclear medicine imaging is also performed:

  1. To visualize blood flow patterns to the heart walls.
  2. To evaluate the presence and extent of suspected or known.
  3. To determine the extent of injury to the heart following a heart attack.
  4. To evaluate the results of bypass surgery or other revascularization procedures designed to restore blood supply to the heart.

In conjunction with an electrocardiogram (ECG), to evaluate heart-wall movement and overall heart function with a technique called cardiac gating.

Is there radiation involved?

Yes. Nuclear Medicine is an imaging test which involves a small amount of radiation to show pictures of the organs, tissues, and bones of the body.

When will I receive my results?

Once completed, you will receive your results within 3-5 business days in your LabFinder portal.

How do I prepare? Do I need to fast?

Please refer to the simple preparation guidelines or consult with your doctor or radiology center where you are being treated. Do not forget to bring your LabFinder Order and Insurance Card to your appointment.

Nuclear Stress Test

Book a Nuclear Med Nuclear Stress Test (Heart)